Celebrating 20 Years of Using Linux & Switching to Devuan

Bloody hell, Murdoch!” has it really been that long? Well, the date on the the purple CD below confirms it…

Testing Devuan ASCII as a replacement for Mint 17.3. With a visit from the first Linux Distro CD I ever used!


Where does the time go, eh?!

For the past few days I have been running my desktop off of one the cute little 80GB Toshiba 5400RPM laptop drives that came inside one of the Dell Inspiron 1501 laptops we bought back in 2007. It was what I had on hand in SATA format and quite surprisingly, it’s actually not that bad – Devuan 2.0 boots faster on it than Slackware 14.2 did off my older SSD. Silly Slackware lol… Anyhow, after accidentally deleting the wrong partition or drive more than a couple of times over the years, I am playing it safe with my change of distros this time. Dotting the i’s, testing the drivers, software, and so on, before diving into the format/reinstall of my Linux SSD.

Having used and liked PCLinuxOS for a year or so a few years back, I gave an XFCE spin of it a whirl and was happy to see that the AMD drivers finally worked for my GCN 1.0 / Pitcarin based R9 270. However, the garbage that is PulseAudio was still there crapping up the system, screwing up recordings using Audacity, so I decided to move onto Devuan in my 20 year anniversary “distro hopping”.

Devuan = (Debian – SystemD) * DarkPurpy Goodness

Turns out, Devuan XFCE installs PulseAudio too and indeed it had the exact same issues as PCLinuxOS (binary signal drops and noise every 0.64 seconds while recording from my TV tuner RCA inputs and other PA related crap…), so out it and it’s stupid problems went! Ah, the sweet relief of GNU/Linux un-stupefied… As with any “plain Debian” installation, many things require manual configuration as compared to Mint, but that’s fine. With Devuan I don’t mind, because I’ll only need to do it once and forget about it until security updates cease in 2023, much as I have done with Mint 17.3, whose security updates will cease early next year.

I have very much enjoyed using Mint 17.3 XFCE! In fact, were it not for the need to keep up to date with security patches, I would be content to keep using it on my desktop until the hardware plumb stops working. With GNU/Linux, this system feels like a super computer and really, for the few games I play in Windows, it’s perfectly fine. So switching from the old software packages in the Ubuntu 14 repo that I enjoy using to slightly newer versions of those software packages in Debian 9 repos, is great. “Change for the sake of change” isn’t my thing.

Stability + Simplicity + Familiarity = Efficiency = Happiness

That’s what GNU/Linux means to me.

It wasn’t always that way, especially in the years between when I discovered Linux and when I started using Libranet Linux (a Debian based distro from North Vancouver, Canada). Prior to those days, the primary function Linux (and the BSDs) served in my life was to gobble up my Interwebs, blank CD/DVDs, and “free time”, while I installed and configured like, twelve bazillion distros. I liked to use the desktop for many things over doing those same thing in Windows, but given my habit of playing Windows based games, I was often too lazy to reboot just to browse the web with Opera in Linux. I could, after all, just browse the internet using Opera for Windows. Anyway, it wasn’t until about Ubuntu 8.04 that GNU/Linux really displaced Windows as my primary operating system. By then drivers and software had finally gotten to the point where everything I wanted to do (other than play Windows based games) actually worked properly. Before then… ggrrr there always something that pissed me off when I ran Linux. Still is when I use Slackware! lol…

All picking on Slackware aside, I really do owe a hell of a lot of “good times” in my life to Patrick and the Slackware gang. Being the second distro I used after trying RedHat on that purple CD (which I bought in a real brick and mortar store back in 1998 folks!), Slackware taught me how to install, configure, and use GNU/Linux in a way that was both fun and useful. I remember using Basic Linux, a floppy disk disto based on Slackware 7, to turn my 486 Compaq LTE/25 into a cool “electric paper machine” that I used to write on. I remember loving the KDE 3.5 desktop that I used with some version of Slackware for a year or so… I loved Slackware up until I got married, had kids, and decided that I wanted to spend more time using the system rather than dicking around with the system. Hence my use of Ubuntu and later Mint, with some Debian 7 and PCLinuxOS sprinkled in there for stability and delicious flavors. Anyway, as much as I do enjoy going “full nerd” with Slackware, at this point in my life Slackware requires more effort to build than I want to put into it. C’est live, n’es pas!

Moving on… Thus far the only issues I have found using Devuan 2.0.0 ASCII are…

  • MTP from my Galaxy S8 is slow as hell and required adding Caja (the MATE file manager) to XFCE to magically kick FUSE into action (works in Thunar now too, even though it didn’t add any MTP related deps…).
  • Mozilla are still jerks. Thanks, I’d rather use Chrome + ALSA than Firefox + PulseAudio.
  • RocketTux gets some funky screen tearing in the top row of tiles, even with compositing enabled. At least it’s not all web pages – screen tearing is a HUGE part of why I won’t use the open source AMD/Ati video drivers.

That’s all I have noticed so far in my pre-switch testing. I hesitate to call this switch away from Mint 17.3 an “upgrade”, because there just isn’t anything I feel I need to “upgrade” to. As far as desktop computing goes, Mint 17.3 XFCE (and the amazing world of GNU software!!) really nailed it. Devuan 2 with XFCE simply carries on hammering it home.

So, thank you – Thank you to everyone who has and who continues to give their time, their effort, their mind, to GNU/Linux.